Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center

Resources for Male Survivors

24 hr. Help Resources

For University of Michigan students, staff, faculty and their loved ones:

  • Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center (SAPAC): (734) 936-3333

For Washtenaw County residents:

  • Safehouse Center: (734) 995-5444

National helpline:


University of Michigan Programs & Initiatives to Address Sexual Assault, Intimate Partner Violence, Stalking, and Sexual Harassment Prevention

University of Michigan Programs & Initiatives to Address Sexual Assault, Intimate Partner Violence, Stalking, and Sexual Harassment Prevention

The following is a list of programs and initiatives that the University of Michigan is spearheading to prevent sexual assault, intimate partner violence, stalking, and sexual harassment on the individual, relationship, community, and societal levels.

A Social Ecological Model:a framework for prevention

Defining Sexual Assault

Evidence

We know that a decision that is biased, arbitrary, or capricious will not meet the test of fundamental fairness.  We know that procedures and decisions must be reasonable.  What is too often left unsaid is that there will be instances in which the admission and consideration of irrelevant evidence, hearsay evidence, illegally obtained evidence, or evidence lacking in credibility will violate fundamental fairness.  There are two basic rules of evidence that should be observed in the campus hearing:  the rule of relevance and the rule of credibility of witnesses/testimony (Sokolow, 2004).

Striving for Justice: A Toolkit for Judicial Resolution Officers

Sexual Assault & TBLG Survivors

People who identify as transgender, bisexual, lesbian, gay and also as survivors of sexual assault face not only the barriers to seeking help that all survivors face, but also a range of obstacles that are unique to the TBLG community.  Some of the issues that are unique to TBLG survivors are listed below.

 


Communities of Color and the Impacts of Sexual Violence

The impact of sexual violence on different communities can be understood by looking at challenges unique to each community. Communities of color often face multiple barriers when dealing with the aftermath of sexual violence. Kimberle Crenshaw described these barriers as being built and strengthened through “the imposition of one burden interacting with pre-existing vulnerabilities to create yet another dimension of disempowerment” (Crenshaw, 1991).


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